Samizdat

"Samizdat: Publishing the Forbidden."

Frank Herbert on Time.

“If he refused to move, he knew that he would remain caught in the timeless web, the eternal now where all events coexisted. This prospect enticed him. He saw Time as a convention shaped by the collective mind of all sentience. Time and space were categories imposed on the universe by his Mind. He had but to break free of the multiplicity where prescient visions lured him.”

–Frank Herbert, Children of Dune, pg. 182. 

Lewis Carroll’s “Jabberwocky.”

JABBERWOCKY

 ‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves 
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; 
All mimsy were the borogoves, 
And the mome raths outgrabe. 

‘Beware the Jabberwock, my son! 
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! 
 Beware the Jujub bird, and shun 
The frumious Bandersnatch!’ 

 He took his vorpal sword in hand: 
Long time the manxome foe he sought — 
 So rested he by the Tumtum tree, 
And stood awhile in thought. 

And as in uffish thought he stood, 
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, 
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, 
 And burbled as it came! 

One, two!! One, two!! And through and through 
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! 
He left it dead, and with its head 
He went galumphing back. 

‘And has thou slain the Jabberwock? 
Come to my arms, my beamish boy! 
O frabjous day! Calloh! Callay! 
He chortled in his joy. 

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves 
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; 
All mimsy were the borogoves, 
And the mome raths outgrabe. ”

–Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking Glass, pp. 19-20.

Mirrors as Labyrinths.

“My other nightmare is that of the mirror. The two are not distinct, as it only takes two facing mirrors to construct a labyrinth. I remember seeing, in the house of Dora de Alvear in the Belgrano district, a circular room whose walls and doors were mirrored, so that whoever entered the room found himself at the center of a truly infinite labyrinth.”

— –Jorge Luis Borges, “Nightmares,” Seven Nights, 1984, pg. 29. 

Borges on the Demonic Origin of Nightmares.

“In all of these words there is an idea of demonic origin, the idea of a demon who causes the nightmare. I believe it does not derive simply from a superstition. I believe that there is–and I speak with complete honesty and sincerity–something true in this idea.”

 –Jorge Luis Borges, “Nightmares,” Seven Nights, 1984, pp. 28-9.

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